Key stage 2 and 3

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Key stage 2 and 3 Printed Circuit Boards

 


 

 

Greeting card

Musical Greeting Card

The musical greeting card project is an excellent introduction to electronics and is suitable for pupils in year 7 upwards.  It is based on the pre-programmed melody generator IC.  The kit is supplied with the tune 'Its a small world' so that a greeting card can be made to suit any occasion.

 

The PCB is printed on thin (1/16") laminate to minimise board height and is designed for surface mount assembly of conventional components so that the back of the PCB can be readily glued into the card.

 

For reliable operation, a reed switch is used to control the circuit.  A range of card pop-up and slider mechanisms can be used in conjunction with a small magnet to operate the switch.

 

 


 

Key-fob torch

Key-fob torch

The torch utilises a high brightness red LED powered by two L736 button cells. The small size of the key-fob PCB makes the project ideal for designing and making economically priced enclosures using a laser cutter or 3-D printer.

 

The PCB is printed on thin (1/16") laminate to minimise board height and is designed for surface mount assembly.  The PCB can be constructed either by using a soldering iron or by using solder paste and a toaster oven.

 

 

 


 

Nightlight project

Nightlight

Using conventional components and a small single sided PCB, the nightlight has proven to be very popular with pupils.  It can inspire creative, individual work from students and enable them to design and make a quality product of which they are proud and want to keep.

 

Illumination by a high brightness LED is controlled by an LDR and timer circuit.  When the light level on the LDR changes from light to dark, the LED is switched on for a time period set by the timing components.  With suitable timing component values, the delay can be set to15 minutes or more.  At the end of the timing period, the LED switches off.  The LED remains off until the timer is recharged by light falling on the LDR.  The quiescent power drain of the circuit is so low that an on/off switch is not required.

 

The PCB is designed to attach directly to a 4 cell PCB mounting battery holder but a PP3 battery and lead can be used instead.

 


 

 

iPod amp 2

iPod amplifier

Based on the popular and low cost TBA820 amplifier IC, the iPod amplifier is a real hit with students.  The project has been carefully designed to minimise difficulties with external wiring.

 

Although the amplifier can operate at 6V it works better from 9V (PP3) or higher. (With a suitable speaker and power supply, it can deliver 1.6W).  The only permanent wiring to the PCB is the power supply (which is passed through two threading holes).  Audio input is via a 3.5mm Jack socket which adds together the left and right channels of a stereo signal.  Two PCBs can be used to reproduce stereo sound by amplifying each channel separately.  The speaker is connected via a 2pin JYK connector.

 

The PCB includes a 'beat' indicator LED which flashes in sync with bass beats.

 


 

Push button badge

Push button badge

Possibly the simplest possible project, the push button badge lights up one or more LEDs on the press of a push button.  With two LEDs, the PCB could be used to provide the eyes in novelty projects and badges.

 

Conventional components are surface mounted onto a thin PCB which can be fixed to a brooch mount.

 


 

Flashing badge

Flashing badge

The flashing badge can control up to 5 LEDs using a dedicated flasher IC at either 1Hz or 2Hz depending on the IC used.  With two LEDs, the PCB could be used to provide the eyes in novelty projects and badges.

 

Conventional components are surface mounted onto a thin PCB which can be fixed to a brooch mount.

 


 

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